welder required for classic

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welder required for classic

Postby craig » Fri 03 Apr 2015 12:17 pm

Does anyone know of any local and reliable welders who can do some chassis repairs to my old Morris 1000?
Many thanks, Craig.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby Pat-H » Thu 23 Apr 2015 7:47 am

Did you sort this Craig?
I have a mig welder but it's more useful for bodywork repairs.
Probably need an arc welder for chassis and my experience of older cars would suggest Gas is even better.
My gas welding kit is now long gone but if you can find some kit I'll happily help.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby craig » Thu 23 Apr 2015 2:25 pm

Hi Pat-H.
I still haven't found anyone. The chap who has been promising to look at it, teased me one last time before he let me down again. :x

Because it is chassis work I'll prefer it to be done by a professional rather than try a DIY weld.
Once it's MOTed again, I'll certainly look you up regarding Mig welding.

Thanks for posting. :)
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby RichardH » Fri 24 Apr 2015 6:29 am

Our local mechanic no longer does welding, but highly recommended the guys at DJ Rover - at the very least you will be able to get it up on the ramp and see what's needed.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby craig » Wed 03 Jun 2015 9:13 am

An update: My Morris needs so much weldng - It's beyond my budget... I can only afford the DIY approach and do as much as I can myself.
It can't be that hard to learn. :?
Pat-H - If your MIG welder is still on the table, I'd appreaciate a little guidance on welding and perhaps purchasing my own.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby RichardH » Wed 03 Jun 2015 4:26 pm

Oh dear - poor old moggie. Hope you manage to get her going again Craig.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby Pat-H » Wed 03 Jun 2015 9:59 pm

Craig I'll make contact over the weekend and pop round and have a look.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby Andy B » Fri 05 Jun 2015 12:48 am

Welding on the flat is not to bad Craig but upside down and vertically are far more tricky I signed up for a college course and have a City & Guilds which was used when I was playing with steam engines. If you intend to take this on please do the course as it could become a safety issue if not done right.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby Pat-H » Fri 05 Jun 2015 6:51 am

Because I learned welding when I used to be a mechanic I hardly ever got to do it on the flat. Upside down was the norm.
When I was a teenager it was all out riggers and inner seals on friends cars.

Sadly I always preferred gas welding as its more flexible particularly with very thin and rusted metal. Arc or even mig welding can end up just blowing holes everywhere.

On the safety side I often ended up being the one sat in the car with a bottle of water putting out the fires! that carpet hair left glued to the metal burns really well.
Luckily mig welding makes a lot less heat and is far ore localised but you still need a second set of eyes on hand.
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Re: welder required for classic

Postby Andy B » Fri 05 Jun 2015 9:20 pm

Pat-H wrote:Because I learned welding when I used to be a mechanic I hardly ever got to do it on the flat. Upside down was the norm.
When I was a teenager it was all out riggers and inner seals on friends cars.

Sadly I always preferred gas welding as its more flexible particularly with very thin and rusted metal. Arc or even mig welding can end up just blowing holes everywhere.

On the safety side I often ended up being the one sat in the car with a bottle of water putting out the fires! that carpet hair left glued to the metal burns really well.
Luckily mig welding makes a lot less heat and is far ore localised but you still need a second set of eyes on hand.


My comments were more directed at Craig as he seems to be intending some DIY!
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